waheedpix:

Baby in Bonnet
January, 1936
©WaheedPhotoArchive, 2012

waheedpix:

Baby in Bonnet

January, 1936

©WaheedPhotoArchive, 2012

Reblogged from waheedpix

soulbrotherv2:

An African Princess Who Stood Unafraid Among Nazis
Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now.

By Jenee Desmond-Harris
Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.
The book follows Massaquoi, born the daughter of the King of Gallinas of Southern Sierra Leone in 1904, to Liberia, Nazi Germany and the segregated American South, where she wrote her memoirs while enrolled at Tennessee’s Fisk University.
She died in 1978, and her story could have died with her.  [Continue reading complete article at The Root.]

soulbrotherv2:

An African Princess Who Stood Unafraid Among Nazis

Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now.

By Jenee Desmond-Harris

Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.

The book follows Massaquoi, born the daughter of the King of Gallinas of Southern Sierra Leone in 1904, to Liberia, Nazi Germany and the segregated American South, where she wrote her memoirs while enrolled at Tennessee’s Fisk University.

She died in 1978, and her story could have died with her.  [Continue reading complete article at The Root.]

Reblogged from soulbrotherv2

(Source: partizany)

Reblogged from partizany

classicladiesofcolor:

Diana Ross and her older sister Barbara Jean, 1945.

classicladiesofcolor:

Diana Ross and her older sister Barbara Jean, 1945.

(Source: lovemyblack.com)

(Source: ulvehund)

Reblogged from ulvehund

1109-83:

Mio Hani (daughter of Susumu Hani) with Osamu Kitajima. In 1972, when Hani was seven years old, Kitajima produced and supervised her debut album, Mio to Juuippiki no Neko.
The previous year Susumu Hani wrote and directed Yôsei no Uta, a documentary chronicling the life of a six year old girl named, Mio (played by Mio Hani).

"…a Japanese girl who moves from France to an orphanage in Sardinia. This film tells the story of her adaptation to the new setting and the adaptation the local children make to her. It begins with her first day of school as she walks in wearing a large name-tag and speaking not one word of Italian. Her world and her new community are artfully depicted in this film as, gradually, she moves from being the butt of jokes to being accepted by her new schoolmates."

The film can be viewed here.

1109-83:

Mio Hani (daughter of Susumu Hani) with Osamu Kitajima. In 1972, when Hani was seven years old, Kitajima produced and supervised her debut album, Mio to Juuippiki no Neko.

The previous year Susumu Hani wrote and directed Yôsei no Uta, a documentary chronicling the life of a six year old girl named, Mio (played by Mio Hani).

"…a Japanese girl who moves from France to an orphanage in Sardinia. This film tells the story of her adaptation to the new setting and the adaptation the local children make to her. It begins with her first day of school as she walks in wearing a large name-tag and speaking not one word of Italian. Her world and her new community are artfully depicted in this film as, gradually, she moves from being the butt of jokes to being accepted by her new schoolmates."

The film can be viewed here.

Reblogged from 1109-83

lostinurbanism:

Nina Simone & Daughter, 1965

lostinurbanism:

Nina Simone & Daughter, 1965

Reblogged from lostinurbanism

midcenturymodernfreak:

1956 Untitled | Shady Grove, Alabama | The Gordon Parks Foundation - Via

midcenturymodernfreak:

1956 Untitled | Shady Grove, Alabama | The Gordon Parks Foundation - Via

natgeofound:

Children wearing Mardi Gras costumes in New Orleans, Louisiana.Photograph by John Hypolite Coquille, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Children wearing Mardi Gras costumes in New Orleans, Louisiana.
Photograph by John Hypolite Coquille, National Geographic

Reblogged from natgeofound

natgeofound:

Friends eat watermelon outside a beach cottage on a summer afternoon on Roanoke Island, North Carolina, 1955.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Friends eat watermelon outside a beach cottage on a summer afternoon on Roanoke Island, North Carolina, 1955.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

Reblogged from natgeofound

Reblogged from adamadam

Reblogged from adamadam

sapta-loka:

Nigerian baby, 1950s
Vintage Nigeria

sapta-loka:

Nigerian baby, 1950s

Vintage Nigeria

Reblogged from nigerianostalgia